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Monday was Earth Day in the calendar.
But every day is Earth Day.

Climate change is on top of the agenda.
But we’ve known about climate change for decades.

If we don’t reduce CO2 emissions by at least 50% by 2030, it means the end of the world as we know it (said Greta Thunberg at the European Parliament a week ago, please read the full notes here).
But the eco-woke have tried to set deadlines to force change, since, say, 1988.

You know how I feel about these buts at this very moment?
That they’re small.

Small in comparison to the magnitude, the attitude, the feeling of momentum. Yes, it’s a feeling. But a common one in some parts of the world right now.

It’s like a movement waiting to happen, like Greta Thunberg puts it (in i-D). The 16-year-old is not the first to address the climate- and ecological crises, obviously. But she is unapologetic, so blunt you have to listen.
Not only because what she says is true in the purest sense.
But also because it’s a reminder of how we’re not raised to speak about climate.
In fact, it’s not how we’re raised to speak about anything, at least not as women.
This is not a joke. It can’t be ridiculed, undermined.

The Global Strike for the Future that Greta Thunberg inspired on 15 April 2019 was one of the most comprehensive manifestations in history. But… no buts.

Norwegian psychologist Per Espen Stoknes has suggested that the movement Greta may have created a social tipping point; a moment when social development takes a big and unexpected leap, gets in touch with politics and brings about lasting change. Sverker Jagers, a Swedish political scientist, has said the effect of a social movement like this is often indirect, but can create a critical mass that is able to pressure on decision makers in politics and business.

So perhaps we shouldn’t be so quick on stating the game is already lost. It’s so easy, and regardless, where will surrendering take us?
And let’s not forget, there might be a collective end-date if governments and corporations won’t follow IPCC guidance. But it’s affected by the smaller parts; the climate wars fought in the different corners.
In fashion, we’re on it too. It’s a slow process and has a lot to do with changing ideas of what’s relevant, one picture at a time. i-D Magazine putting Greta Thunberg on their cover will not change the world. But doing so suggests she’s a role model. It gives her the opportunity of conveying a story about another type of society. So, it instills hope and is fare more constructive than, say, shaming. At least if you ask me. And people like Per Espen Stoknes.

It means something.
It all means something.

Images: Greta Thunberg on the cover of i-D Magazine photographed by Harley Weir. Leaves by Louise Enhörning. 


Bread and Snakes with Lexie Smith

Posted in Style
by Lisa Corneliusson on 23 February, 2019

I’m obsessed with Lexie Smith. She works across mediums as a baker, writer and artist and has always been drawn to the slightly askew. “For now my primary forms are bread and language”, she writes on her website All Semantics, a project that allows her to focus “more on words than on actually making three-dimensional, consumable objects” (although I think her bread thing is partly about not creating waste). I first set my eyes on her when she was modeling for Maryam Nassir Zadeh and it seems, it never ends with this lady. I read she’s done an illustrated food journal (that is yet to be published) and that she launched a wholesale bakery a couple of years ago. She is “slowly designing some work wear” with her sister (as of 2016) and last year, she did a two-month literary performance project executed in a defunct Hudson News at LaGuardia Airport.

Lexie Smith has a collaborative publishing platform, Bread on Earth, built “to support the diverse dialogues that stem from our relationship to grain”, and has plans on doing a Bread Web like a Wikipedia of bread types (you can submit your bread and help build the bread web here).
She doesn’t want to work in a kitchen anymore, but doesn’t see herself as a food artist and doesn’t believe “food is art“. Rather, she likes food because it’s the opposite; “It’s utilitarian, it’s critical, it’s fuel, and then it disappears”; and treats bread as a medium; something with metaphorical power. Bread making as a “window into civilization” (quote), how about that.

Reading interviews with Lexie Smith is a joy, her language rich. Watch this video and you’ll see what I mean. “Bread is malleable and full of surprises.” Amen.

Follow Lexie Smith here.

Images: Top portrait by Eric Oglander for i-D. The rest except the snake (which is from Lexie's Instagram): Emily Andrews for The New York Times

This winter has been long… already. I was different kinds of sick for almost a month over Christmas and all I’ve been wearing since November is yoga pants and huge knits in black. I really admire people who have the energy to dress with imagination in the winter. I, instead, dream about warmer weather and lighter clothes. The other day I placed a bid on the top to the left on eBay and won… In summer, I’m a sucker for anything pink! And speaking of pink, have you seen this insane RÖR bench by my friend Fredrik Paulsen? Please come to my house little benchie…

Clockwise from the top: Lisa Hellrup sculpture, The Ode To. Mia Lounge Set, Lisa Says Gah. Soap Cubes by Sabine Marcelis, Etage Projects. Sculpture by Anton Alvarez. Togo sofa, Michael Ducaroy, Vervlogenjaren. Bella Hadid in Marine Serre, Stevie Dance. Maryam Nassir Zadeh Olympa Wedges, Vestiaire Collective. RÖR bench, Fredrik Paulsen for Atelier Francois Pouenat. Middle: Bowl by Åsa Jungnelius via Anette Mörner.


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