Tid kvar —

Högsta bud —

There’s nothing as refreshing as a new beginning. 

While more established fashion brands struggle to move away from wasteful processes, emerging brands have all the opportunities to aim for clean from the start.

That’s why we pay a lot of our attention here at Make it last on new brands; new ideas.

It’s not all about aiming for a clean or circular supply chains; it’s just as much about finding new business models.

One of the brands currently on my radar is For Days. Offering a subscription service of t-shirts and other organic cotton basics, with member being allowed to send things back in any condition and as often as they like, For Days aims for no-consumption, but rather reusing and recycling. One of the founders is Kristy Caylor, she left Maiyet in 2015 as she felt it had become inefficient as a business in terms of over-production and wastage.

The subscription model has been tested – but also abandoned. We have yet to see the real breakthrough in subscribing to clothes (like we do with music, films and cars). One of the big challenges is overcoming the need for the consumer to handle physical products (instead of signing up for, say, Spotify) and supply chain logistics; But the very idea of access over ownership is something an increasing number of consumers are interested in. It’s about sustainability; eliminating clutter; but just as much about ”having fun,” says Caylor. It’s probably safe to say that subscription services will soon be an established ”retail” channel alongside e-commerce and bricks-and-mortar.

If it would be easier, I would happily rent clothes or subscribe to fashion libraries. Not only for the obvious moments like weddings or whatever else occasions with dress codes that my everyday wardrobe doesn’t cover, but also for things I don’t want to buy because I think my usage will be limited. Come summer, the sudden urge for dreamy summer dresses? Sure, but I don’t use them for 11 months of the year. Like Caylor puts it: “I thought about how convenient it would be if basics like this could float in and out of our lives when we needed them, and they could be recycled and repurposed when we were finished. I could have what I needed, when I needed it, without the guilt when I was finished with it.”


My Laura Lombardi Hoops

Posted in Style
by Lisa Corneliusson on 24 May, 2018

I love the work of New York-based Laura Lombardi and get inspired by her visual world. She balances a raw style with elements of classical art, sculpture and mixed media, it doesn’t get too pretty, which I like. She works almost exclusively in raw or recycled materials and sees her work as an exercise in sustainability. Explore her world here. The hoops are the Medium Hoops and the additional images are from her Tumblr.


I don’t know about you, but I’m tired of cropped jeans. I want full length, and never too tight! My favorite style since many years has been a Wrangler Western Cowboy Cut, probably at least four decades old (you can find them on eBay, search for the style 14MWZWK).

I don’t think I’ve bought new-new jeans in years, but I recently stumbled upon a style that caught my interest. Vivien Ramsay used to be Design Director at Levi’s but now has a studio on the northern coast of the Philippines. It’s a vertical workshop, meaning design, patterns, sewing, dyeing and printing are all done there, overseen by Ramsay. Her Standard Jean is a product of years of denim experimentation. The perfect high waisted, straight leg jean, like the 501 improved.

Lina in Baserange top nand Vivien Ramsay jeans

I asked my beautiful best friend Lina try them on when we were in Los Angeles a few weeks ago. The inseam is extra long, so that anyone can cut them to their perfect length. They must have been like 4o inches, no one can possibly have legs that long! and it felt a little wasteful, but the fit was great and I think these unwashed jeans will age with such grace.

And I’m so inspired by Ramsays work. She harvests her own dyes and uses botanical color from such things as indigo flowers, almond leaves, ginger, and coffee musk to create her palette. Natural fibers such as wool, cashmere, silk, hand-woven silk lace and cotton jersey are the backbone of her designs and the almost experimental layering of color on these fabrics makes each piece slightly unlike any other.

Check her out here and follow her on Instagram here. Buy the jeans here and note: Lina’s also wearing the perfect black top by Baserange, also available via Kindred Black, our favorite eco-luxury destination.


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