Tid kvar —

Högsta bud —

Monday was Earth Day in the calendar.
But every day is Earth Day.

Climate change is on top of the agenda.
But we’ve known about climate change for decades.

If we don’t reduce CO2 emissions by at least 50% by 2030, it means the end of the world as we know it (said Greta Thunberg at the European Parliament a week ago, please read the full notes here).
But the eco-woke have tried to set deadlines to force change, since, say, 1988.

You know how I feel about these buts at this very moment?
That they’re small.

Small in comparison to the magnitude, the attitude, the feeling of momentum. Yes, it’s a feeling. But a common one in some parts of the world right now.

It’s like a movement waiting to happen, like Greta Thunberg puts it (in i-D). The 16-year-old is not the first to address the climate- and ecological crises, obviously. But she is unapologetic, so blunt you have to listen.
Not only because what she says is true in the purest sense.
But also because it’s a reminder of how we’re not raised to speak about climate.
In fact, it’s not how we’re raised to speak about anything, at least not as women.
This is not a joke. It can’t be ridiculed, undermined.

The Global Strike for the Future that Greta Thunberg inspired on 15 April 2019 was one of the most comprehensive manifestations in history. But… no buts.

Norwegian psychologist Per Espen Stoknes has suggested that the movement Greta may have created a social tipping point; a moment when social development takes a big and unexpected leap, gets in touch with politics and brings about lasting change. Sverker Jagers, a Swedish political scientist, has said the effect of a social movement like this is often indirect, but can create a critical mass that is able to pressure on decision makers in politics and business.

So perhaps we shouldn’t be so quick on stating the game is already lost. It’s so easy, and regardless, where will surrendering take us?
And let’s not forget, there might be a collective end-date if governments and corporations won’t follow IPCC guidance. But it’s affected by the smaller parts; the climate wars fought in the different corners.
In fashion, we’re on it too. It’s a slow process and has a lot to do with changing ideas of what’s relevant, one picture at a time. i-D Magazine putting Greta Thunberg on their cover will not change the world. But doing so suggests she’s a role model. It gives her the opportunity of conveying a story about another type of society. So, it instills hope and is fare more constructive than, say, shaming. At least if you ask me. And people like Per Espen Stoknes.

It means something.
It all means something.

Images: Greta Thunberg on the cover of i-D Magazine photographed by Harley Weir. Leaves by Louise Enhörning. 


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