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Slow Sailing Aboard Narinan

Posted in Life
by Make it last on 27 August, 2018

Succumb to nature’s rhythms somewhere in the Mediterranean, under the watchful eye of Janus.

Romans believed Janus to be god of beginnings (hence ‘January’) more specifically, thresholds and is usually depicted with two faces, one looking forwards and one backwards. Based between Barcelona and the Balearics, you may spot a sail billowing in the wind with such a sight and if so, it more than likely belongs to Narinan. Owner and skipper Kenneth offers a home on the sea to anyone climbing aboard his vessel, ready to connect with nature.

Can you introduce yourself?

– I’ve sailed since I was a kid. I started it as my main hobby or sport, I used to race dinghies, later I became a sail instructor (when I was a teenager) and a professional sailor when I needed to start working to pay the bills. I have always sailed and worked in sailboats, I haven’t worked in power boats yet. Nature is my passion, and as I grew up near the sea, this has been the shortest way to approach it.

What is a slow sailing holiday with Narinan like?

– Slow sailing is more than being in a yacht visiting glamorous villages – it’s about your relationship with Nature. It’s about relying on the weather forecast to decide where our next stop will be, about going with the tide instead of going against it. Slow sailing means that you need to forget about your watch, about schedules, about visiting too many places. It’s about living the present.

– Slow sailing is about forgetting screens, unplugging the electronic devices, yours and the ones from the boat. When we do this we look at Nature to see where we are, instead than into a GPS screen or at a smartphone or Ipad. It’s about writing a logbook with your trip details, with the names of the persons you have met or found that day, also with your feelings, about finding the time to look at the stars every night.

Tell us more about the recent collaboration with Octaevo?

– Marcel Baer, the Octaevo founder and the creative mind behind this beautiful project, has been part of Narinan’s crews in different trips. He enjoys sailing and joining us. Just before summer he called me, asking about the possibility to have one of his drawings travelling through the Mediterranean in a boat’s sail. A few minutes later he was sending me photoshop images with Janus deity face in Narinan’s genoa sail. I got totally in love with the idea.  

– The Janus print goes beyond a simple visual and has become a character in itself. With its  strong personality and all the ideas that the ancient god represents, Janus is the perfect symbol to accompany Narinan on her voyages. With his two wise faces, one on each side of the sail,  he has overseen our adventures in the past and now keep a watchful eye on everything that remains to be explored. Janus attracts the sight of all the boats we pass by, and it’s a strong presence on deck when we sail. It’s a wonderful feeling.

A sailing trip you will never forget?  

– Lots of them! Once I sailed a boat like Narinan from Australia to Barcelona. It took us nine months. It is obvious that I’ll never forget it, it was one of my most important life experiences.

– But I always promote that the best things – moments, experiences – don’t need to be big, long, expensive, far away… You can find the nicest moments of life at home or really next to it. I am totally happy if I sail in fifteen knots of wind, with a nice crew. I feel in paradise when at anchor in the Balearic Islands, seeing the sunrise and swimming in those early very quiet mornings, before the sea breeze picks up. I will never forget some perfect short sails I had, and many of those peaceful mornings.

Some advice for first timers going on a sailing holiday?

– Forget about the time, about the phone. Get some nice books and enjoy the passages. Destination and arriving into a nice spot is very nice, but enjoy the peace and the calm of moving during hours from one place to another.

– Ask to collaborate in the boat jobs and manoeuvres, learn a few knots and the very few basics of sailing. It will make your trip richer. Also find time to sit and enjoy the landscape by yourself, somewhere nice on the deck.

Let’s finish with some hidden gems please…

– Columbretes Islands, a totally remote place in Spain, you can only reach them by boat, there is not much more than beauty and nature. We did a trip with Narinan some years ago, we felt blessed to be there.

– Cabrera Archipelago National Park is my favourite place. The archipelago has great natural value. Due to its isolation throughout history, it remained unchanged. The coastal landscape of Cabrera is often considered the best preserved on the Spanish coast, and indeed in the Mediterranean Sea. The park attracts relatively few visitors due to its remoteness. There is no permanent population, but there might be under 30 National Park staff members and a very small police squad. Once of the nicest things to do in the island is to share a few drinks with them in the island’s cozy and genuine bar.

 

You can find out more (including last remaining spaces for September) here and follow the boat here.


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