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Some brands probably shouldn’t be so quick on shouting “sustainability”. Being one of today’s most popular buzzword, sometimes used pretty loosely by brands who want to score some easy marketing points, you can appreciate the brands that keep a low profile. Looking for authenticity, and transparency, it might not always be the brands who make most noise that keep the most sustainable practices (a couple of organic cotton pieces does not a sustainable brand make). We respect the quiet actors that incorporates sustainability into their business model without feeling the need to make a big deal out of it, simply keeping a modern and progressive approach to fashion. ECKHAUS LATTA is one such brand.

Not feeling a need to put a label on themselves, sustainable/conventional, they’re nevertheless known to be favoring recycled and deadstock fabrics for their collections. Designer duo Mike Eckhaus and Zoe Latta told Vogue in 2015 that they estimated about 90 percent of their line to be made with materials sourced in that way. “From the beginning it was never some sort of strategy, like, we want to be a recycling brand,” Latta told Vogue.com. “We love the principles of sustainability and resourcefulness—we work with them constantly. But it’s not about us identifying as that for the sake of selling more.” Trying to scale up, however, they started working with European mills last year as deadstock does have its limitations.

Best friends and later on business partners Eckhaus and Latta met while studying textile arts respectively sculpture at Rhode Island School of Design, and founded the New York and Los Angeles-based label in 2012, two years post graduation. Often referred to as “avant-garde”, their dynamic and artful line has become a favorite among fashion editors, creatives and other influential forces. Known to reject gender binaries, showcasing “inclusive catwalks” and blurring the line between art and fashion, the brand has come to stand for diversity and authenticity in addition to just being plain cool. We like them especially for treating sustainability as the norm, opposed to something deviant, and only wish they would hold on to it as they continue to grow.

Visit ECKHAUS LATTA here and follow here.

 

Brand to watch is our regular dispatch of standout labels merging ethics with aesthetics.


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