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Brand to Watch: Peet Dullaert

Posted in Style
by adakallgren on 21 June, 2017

As so often is the case in times of political and social uncertainty, fashion is re-tapping eras defined by overly optimistic and opulent style. This season, it’s the 1980s – and fuchsia pink frills, decadent drapes and exaggerated florals have seized runways, editorials and shop floors everywhere. The purpose? To spread positivity and hope for better times to come, an optimist might say; whilst the more cynically minded rejects it as escapism. Either way, the purpose and product are at one – but must optimistic dressing equal peacocking opulence?
Peet Dullaert, a designer that recently came under our radar, challenges this notion by portraying his positive outlook the subtle way. Rooted in tailoring, Dullaert’s softly spoken designs tackles the challenge that is unisex tailoring through intelligently crafted fit and flow. His drape-heavy pieces are created with the idea of a forward spirit in motion, connecting humanity, and celebrating the freedom of movement. The ‘Concorde’ trousers, for example, are inspired by the ground-breaking, unifying means of transport, and similar – positive, forward-looking – design references can be found throughout his collections.
The dreamy but refined draping also translates perfectly into an ambitious repertoire of bags, shoes, jewellery and even mobile phone cases. Cementing that optimistic outlook further, parts of the profits made go to a charity equipping families in need with seeds to “plant their way out of extreme poverty”. The verdict? Optimist fashion can take any shape or form – with a streamlined product and purpose, the result is sure to have a positive outcome.

 

Brand to watch is our regular dispatch of standout upcoming labels merging ethics with aesthetics.


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