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Brand to Watch: Sophie Anderson

Posted in Style
by adakallgren on 31 May, 2017

Blink, and you still wouldn’t miss the eye-catching accessories fashion has endorsed for summer. Designers enthusiastic about leisured days by the pool, that is Dolce & Gabbana and Matthew Williamson, but also more polished labels like Oscar de la Renta, have all embraced the fun, quirky appeal of the pom pom. Knitted or woven, this season small colourful balls are dangling off bags, earrings and sandals everywhere. The leading multi-brand retailers have taken note and chosen to source some of their quota from artisan label Sophie Anderson.
With detail-heavy, graphic/ethnic printed hand-woven totes, shoulder bags and clutches, the bold, colourful brand perfectly fits the trending maximalist accessory bill. A lifelong wanderlust has inspired Sophie Anderson’s vivid aesthetic – born in Kuwait, raised in Oman and long-term residing in South America, her influences from traditional craft and patterns make full sense.
Employing over 750 Wayuu artisans across Colombia’s remote La Guajira desert, the nomadic designer is shaping her ethics also through her choice of raw materials. Her punchy, vibrant accessories make great alternative summerwear for those not so into full-on florals. As colourful as they may be, the graphic print elements do the hats and handbags contemporary justice. Consider for example the Lilla bag, inspired by Frida Kahlo.

Brand to watch is our regular dispatch of standout upcoming labels merging ethics with aesthetics.


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