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Filippa K and Mistra Future Fashion have initiated “Circular Design Speeds”—an industry-embedded pilot study to explore different speeds of fashion with the aim to generate circular and sustainable garments.

The problem for fashion brands as they start looking into sustainability, and especially sustainable fabrics, seems to be that the options today are very limited. We mean: organic cotton probably shouldn’t even count, considering that it, in the end, do have a negative impact on the environment, yet that’s what most commercial brands settle for. The solution to this is of coarse to put a lot more effort into researching the alternatives. We need to invent new raw materials and processes that are actually sustainable, ‘cause much of the stuff that’s “standard” today isn’t going to make the cut in the long run.
Our friends at Filippa K realizes this need, and we’re sure it’s because they—as frontrunners and explorers in the field of sustainable fashion—has felt the frustration caused by current limitations. So, hear this: they’re doing something about it!
Filippa K recently announced a new industry research project called “Circular Design Speeds”, which they’ve initiated together with Mistra Future Fashion (a research program for circular economy). The two-year project, led by Professor Rebecca Earley and Dr. Kate Goldsworthy of University of the Arts London, includes researching, developing and testing of new strategic design for 100% circular fashion garments—this in hopes of making Filippa K a circular and much more sustainable brand by 2030. The key-insights of the project will also be continuously shared with others in “Value to Others”-seminars.
The purpose is, and we quote Filippa K’s sustainability director Elin Larsson, “to develop circular garments where all environmental impacts and aspects during a full life cycle are taken into account and optimized based on a pre-determined life length”. By exploring the impact of different “speeds” of fashion—and this refers to the speed of use—they’ll get a better understanding for the lifecycle of a product, which is a key element in developing a more sustainable industry.

Read more about Circular Design Speeds here!


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