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Tanzania halt imports of second-hand clothing in a bid to boost their textile industry

On our minds is the planned banning of imported second-hand clothes in East Africa in attempt to revive local clothing production. Through a series of training sessions, the Tanzanian government is planning to equip young nationals with tailoring skills and encourage them to get involved in local garment manufacturing. The decision to cut clothing imports from wealthier countries was made in March this year, in the hope of kickstarting a revival of the region’s garment industry which in the 1970s employed hundred thousands of people, but since the introduction of cheap imports has faced factory closures and job losses. While academics argue that the move will boost the local economy by creating jobs, critics have said that the ban may cause hardship on the poorer communities as locally produced garments are expected to cost more than imported ones. Read more here.


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