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A hidden camera project questioning the contradictive attitudes towards child labour in the fashion supply chain.

Still common practice in the garment industry, child labour tend to fall in between any social cover, making children an advantageous work force for factory owners still. Concluding with the message that ‘children in the First world and Third world are no different’, the video is calling on the public to reject the industry’s double standards. Watch it here.

On our minds is The Child Labour Experiment, a hidden camera project questioning the contradictive attitudes towards child labour in the fashion supply chain. Initiated by Fashion Revolution Germany, five German 10 to 12-year-olds were filmed as they approached fashion retailers around Berlin offering to work long hours for little pay. All rejected, the filmed response shows uncomfortable not to say shocked reactions towards the prospective job applications.


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