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Nespresso's capsules are recyclable. What if all your best memories could be recyclable too?

Let’s talk about coffee. I start my mornings with an oat milk latte. Hehe, that sounds very “lifestyle” of me, but it’s true. Then I down shots of espresso throughout the day to keep my energy levels up.

I’ve given this behavior a lot of thought. Buying a take away latte on my way to work, well I’m not gonna lie–it’s nice!–but I decided a couple of years ago that it’s not justifiable. Neither for my budget nor the environment.

Instead I got a coffee machine for my house, and a genius aluminium take away cup. (The cup is with me even when I don’t have time to make coffee at home–so that when I do buy take away coffee, I’ll ask to get it poured in my cup instead of in a paper cup.)

IMG_6311-kopiera

When it comes to bean flavors, I’m not very loyal– I’m happy as long as the coffee is sustainably produced.

When Nespresso asked me to present a competition with them, I said yes because it’s about recycling. An important issue, obviously, and one that I care about.

Nespresso works with questions of recycling, and their coffee capsules are 100 percent recyclable. (It’s up to you to make sure to recycle them though–don’t forget.)

Now to the competition:

Imagine if everything qualitative would be recyclable? Like that perfect surf wave in Biarritz last month, or that concert with Reigning Sound earlier this summer?

Share your best #tbt moment on Instagram – a qualitative memory that you would love to re-live. Hashtag #recycling and #whatelse and you’re in the running to become an owner of a Nespresso machine–and a recycling bin!

And don’t miss @nespressosverige on Instagram, where the finalists will be presented. Full terms and conditions on nespresso.se.

Good luck!


8 Comments

Rapha: "I also see the problem with not recycling what’s already in use.": but the capsules wouldn't be (or less) in use if you wouldn't buy or advertise for it! I agree 100% with Elins comment,plus: to pursue sustainability in the coffee world there are billion better ways than nespressos exploitation of environment and humans.
October 28, 2015

JohannaO: Thank you for a very inspiring blog! I understand that you probably have to make tricky decisions every day, it's not so easy to act sustainably in a fundamentally unsustainable world, and I do really appreciate all your efforts with this site. I would just want to bring up the issue that we often use some words very loosely, such as sustainable in "this sustainable sweater" (what does that even mean!) or environmentally friendly (pretty sure it still had some environmental impact, just not as much). As for recycling, even if we do sort our waste, recycling always means material is lost and contaminated, energy is used, and not creating the waste in the first place is always better (like with your cup). Language is just so powerful, so why not reinvent it too while we're at it! Also: there are alternatives to the Nespresso capsules, eg. http://www.ethicalcoffeecompany.com/en, in plastic and with fair trade coffee in them. The recyclability can be questioned of course. ;-)
October 28, 2015

JohannaN: Is it possible to find Fair Trade coffee from Nespresso? Have had a really hard time to find capsule coffee with Fair Trade...
October 28, 2015

Elin: If you really want to inspire people to think twice about everyday practices, it is probably way more progressive to inform about the environmental impact of capsules as increasing waste. That would be way more progressive instead of campaigning for the use of such products, and giving Nestlés a reputation they don't deserve. I think it is necessary to be really critical about the bigger picture of consuming, which includes big actors like Nestlé. In contrast to what you are doing in this campaigning, one needs to step out of it and perhaps even question the mare presence of such companies and campaigns in the media landscape in order to change consumer habits. I don't mean to be mean or bitchy, but I really think it is important to dare to really think critically and question the power of the big actors related to consumption if we want to create a sustainable lifestyle.
October 28, 2015

Emma Elwin: I understand your concern. I think that a lot of people use these capsules every day and most of them are unaware about the fact that they are recyclable. I think that's worth pointing out. I do see the bigger issue and that we need to decrease our waste amount drastically. But I also see the problem with not recycling what's already in use. We hope to inspire people to think twice about their everyday practices.
October 28, 2015

sarah: I totally agree with the comments above.I like your posts but I really don't see why you have to sell your blog & your credibility for nestlé campaigns which obviously aren't sustainable at all.A bit disappointed..
October 28, 2015

Jessica: Love your blog! but I have to agree with the comment above. their recycling programme has been questioned alot and most pods end up in landfills
October 28, 2015

Elin: Being a part of Nestlé, which work has been questioned immensely I can't help thinking that Nespresso's recycle campaign is just bullshit, specifically when capsule coffee is questionable from an environmental perspective in the first place. Sorry but I don't think this campaign goes very well with your profile, which I do like (most of the time :))!
October 28, 2015

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